Links of the day | 在网上找到

Google and Microsoft bury the hatchet | Techeye – this is potentially huge. Especially if Microsoft is considering itself to be less of an OS business and more of an enabler.

10 forces that threaten to tear the internet apart | World Economic Forum – really nice read

How Traditional Storytelling Is Ruining Virtual Reality Film – not really that surprising, it took years for the craft of cinema storytelling to

Nokia to buy digital health firm Withings for $191 million – Nokia said Tuesday it is buying French fitness gadget maker Withings to kickstart its re-entry into the consumer market and boost its move into digital health. Smart buy, Withings design some the nicest wearables out there

Daring Fireball: The Encryption Farce – interesting read of WSJ coverage on Apple vs. FBI legal issues

Top risk expert says Apple could be shut out of China | South China Morning Post – more likely to be about helping domestic brands as China understands the need to defend against foreign attacks , more so than US politicians

BeautifulPeople.com Leaks Very Private Data of 1.1 Million ‘Elite’ Daters — And It’s All For Sale – Forbes – but its a handy database for identity theft and blackmail

Why Facebook and Baidu Are Becoming Fast Friends — The Information – in addition to Chinese e-commerce businesses looking to sell abroad

Operational WhatsApp (on iOS) — Medium – tweak the security settings on Whatsapp

Three ways behavioural science can identify the best messenger for your campaign | PR Week – ok op-ed, it reminded me a lot of the narrative around Edelman’s Trust Barometer in past years

Reject Parochial Nationalism for Sake of Continued Progress_英文频道_手机财新网 – interesting, however seems very out of step with the government position

The Internet Really Has Changed Everything. Here’s the Proof. — Backchannel – As we discuss other apps on his home screen — YouTube, eBay, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo  – we forget the draw that Yahoo! Sports is

Microsoft Android patent-licensing revenue falling – market is skewing to cheaper handsets and not all (Chinese) manufacturers are paying licensing fees. I also presume the razor thin to no margins mean Microsoft legal action wouldn’t be worthwhile. And if it was done in China wouldn’t be likely to succeed