Wall Street versus Sesame Street |華爾街 与 芝麻街

I noticed the #occupysesamestreet hashtag on Twitter and decided to delve a bit further vis-à-vis #occupywallstreet.  #occupysesamestreet is a small meme but I wanted to get an idea of how many people it had reached versus it’s more serious competition. I used Google Insights for Search as a kind of measure of wider audience awareness.
Google insights
Orange is the search term occupy wall street and blue is occupy sesame street. There isn’t much competition but you can just see the slight uptake that Sesame Street has gained over the last few days measured.
occupysesamestreet
Then I dipped into the great satan of social: Facebook to see what was happening. I was quite surprised to see that the Occupy Sesame Street page had over 35,000 likes compared to just south of 5,000 for the Occupy Wall Street page.
occupywallstreet
Now there are factors that come into play with Occupy Wall Street:

  • People maybe reluctant to put their name down as they may be seen as a troublemaker
  • People may be interested in signing up instead for their local protest page

I suspect that at least part of it is that the silent majority (yes I am aware of the Richard Nixon reference), whilst curious about the happenings are just not that engaged with the political action taking place. They are passionate about Sesame Workshop (what used to be Children’s Television Workshop) programmes and shows the continued power of the Sesame Street brand amongst adults.

Which is why I won’t be holding my breath waiting for a popular uprising leading to a worldwide revolution just yet.