Jargon Watch: Porncast

Porncast – It had to happen, a new media opportunity opens up and the adult entertainment industry jumps right in.According to Wired columnist Gina Linn there is a small community of people making audio erotica recordings on MP3, and video is starting to appear on aggregators of podcast content including

Odeo.Major players like Penthouse, Private and Playboy made thumbnail-sized picture collections available to capitalise on the iPods photo viewing feature.

Easier to conceal in a school bag or briefcase and less likely to be found than a magazine stash under your bed, porncasts offer descrete consumption on the go. See also Podnography.


Rabbit-Proof Fence

Thanks to the Interesting People email list for pointing out this: if you input Tianamen with a capital T into the Chinese version of Google, you get images of the student protests from a number of years ago.

Hot Stuff

InfoWorld‘s daily podcast claimed that Wi-Fi hotspots had passed 100,000; 2,000 of which are in Seoul (South Korea). The US had the most Wi-Fi hotspots, with the UK in second place.Talking of hotspots, Simon Willison pointed me in the direction of Memeorandum.com which highlights what’s the heat online in terms of blogs and news articles. At the moment it has two sections: technology and news.

The folks that write the WWNK newsletter look at the likelihood of a hot war with Iran and indicated that the next edition of their thought provoking emails will be their last:

Dear Subscribers, After more than two years and 114 issues of What We Now Know, it’s time to say goodbye.

The reason why we are calling it quits is trivial but significant: Money. Call it filthy lucre, but as our investor-readers know, ultimately it’s the substance that makes the world go around… and that keeps newsletters get published.

What We Now Know initially started out as a pet project of Casey Research’s Managing Editor, David Galland–soon after being fed and cared for by Senior Editor Shannara Johnson and a small but excellent team of freelancers.

WWNK was controversial and funny, scientific and flamboyant at the same time. Not everybody always agreed with its contents… in fact, it managed to step onto various toes with precious regularity. But it also amused, informed, entertained, and touched many people.

Like all proud parents, your editors had high aspirations and goals for our brainchild, and we frequently talked and dreamed about what it might become when it grew up.

Destiny had planned differently, though. The big brothers and sisters of What We Now Know grew and blossomed far more quickly and soon overshadowed their little brother, taking precedence in daily business. Sadly, we had to admit that although WWNK was receiving raving reviews from its readers, it failed to pull its own weight.

So, in the same way as we buy stocks low and sell them high, we feel it’s important to give up a good thing while it’s still good. It was a great ride, and we don’t regret a minute of it.

Next week’s What We Now Know (1/31/06) will be the last.

Meanwhile the folks at IG Trendcentral had a couple of interesting links:

  • Gabriel Urist makes jewellery based on classic trainer designs for a touch of bling. It reminds me of the adidas superstar pendants that Oki-Ni had when adidas did the big celebration of the the superstar last year.
  • Worn Piece make clothes that look like Maharishi raiding a thrift store. They customise surplus fatigues and have clothing designs that make political statements a bit more clever than your red Che t-shirt.

Trust me, I’m just like you

I got up early on Monday to go Edelman’s seventh annual Trust barometer roadshow thanks to an invite from Richard Edelman and Dr Stuart Smith. There was some interesting items that came out of the research conducted by their StrategyOne division. The rise of bloggers and individuals as pundits was a cornerstone of their presentation. People want to hear from their peers rather than a CEO, or a PR person and blogging is a key facilitator of this trend.This means that the standard ‘command and control’ way of corporate communications and dissemination of messaging has to adapt and yield to cope with these new company ambassadors.

Surprisingly, one of the speakers admitted that corporate reputation wouldn’t necessarily damage sales all that much, (with Nike’s success as a trainer manufacturer cited as a prime example). However, trust in a company and hence the company’s resistance to market shocks would be affected.US companies were seen to be less trusted by Europeans a so-called trust deficit. Where a company was from (headquartered) was seen as a key factor in how much trust we had in it. So if you’re setting up your Global MegaCorp, register it in Germany or Canada as these countries were universally trusted.

Edelman client Microsoft was considered the world’s most trusted company, despite the anti-trust ruling, Windows viruses, spam mail, spyware and software patches. Key to this shift was the repositioning of Bill Gates as human being with appearances on Live8 and Buckingham Palace collecting an honourary knighthood. I guess that means that there’s hope for a even poor sinner like Jim Bakker being redeemed in the public eye ;-).

Noticable by their absence, online brands had NO unprompted recall amongst those surveyed indicating that the giants of the web need to do more to build brand equity and trust amongst consumers.

More traditional technology companies benefited from a positive attitude and a lack of baggage like obesity for food companies, or global warming for energy companies. Though I couldn’t help but wonder how long is it before the likes of Greenpeace puts e-waste on the agenda with Dell and Apple in the dock?

Media and entertainment companies had a low level of trust, but are still relied upon as providers of trusted information.

I got buttonholed by a PR manager from a breast cancer charity who wanted to find some one with expertise about blogging so I gave her my business card. I am sure that she will be also availing herself of Edelman’s pro-bono consultancy carried out through the Media Trust.

Blogging seems to have worked corporate communications managers into a bit of a frenzy in the same way that webcasting did seven years ago. Things are about to get interesting…

On another note, it looks like Richard Edelman is about to start podcasting.

Movin’


My first transaction online was registering and paying for a piece of shareware software at Kagi.com for my Mac whilst I was still in college. I can’t remember what it did now, but I remember that the author was a student at a Scottish university.


The first thing I purchased online in what most people would understand as e-commerce was a Kevin ‘Reese Saunderson CD under the name e-dancer from Boxman.com. I can remember why I loved Boxman.I had read about them in an article in the Sunday Times, it was a way of getting CDs from all over Europe in one place, Boxman would buy at the lowest price, consolidate their stock in one warehouse in Holland and pass on much of the savings to the consumer.

(CDWOW have a similar approach and have incurred the wraith of the record industry who like to have keep up market barriers to maximise profit margins.)I picked up an import copy of the Troubleman soundtrack by Marvin Gaye, when I couldn’t get a UK copy on back order from HMV. The mix of choice and price the e-commerce killer application for me.

Unfortunately Boxman.com unraveled for a number of reasons. Usability experts put it down the search function on the site being the only way for finding what you were looking for (although I had no trouble). Tony Salter, one of the directors in the business laid the fault at the foot of the software which controlled the supply chain of the site. In order to fulfill on its promise, Boxman needed to:

  • Track wholesale prices and cost of delivery across Europe, including comparison pricing for the same product with different national catalogue numbers
  • Organise shipping in the most effective and efficient manner
  • Track customer orders and trends
  • Calculate the most effective and efficient ways to ship goods

This was on top of the complex website functions visible to the consumer. The system would be much more complex than your typical JD Edwards ERP set-up, so Boxman got some of the brightest names in IT to help out: IBM. The project seems to have been a learning experience for IBM as the software failed to deliver on its promise. Anyway, Slate.com have a timely reminder on the importance of logistics management, before we all get lost in reverie around web services revolutionising the online world.