Links of the day | 在网上找到

Welcome to the most pro-Brexit town in Britain | FT – One thickset Lithuanian man asked why English people did not seem to like foreign workers. “They complain about us,” he said. “But why they not do the work?”

Why Donald Trump is declaring war on all fronts | Hong Kong Economic Journal Insights – Trump’s approach has quite a lot in common with Mao Zedong’s class-struggle philosophy. Nice analysis

Fullstopnewparagraph — Freelance copywriter | London – really nicely designed site via our Matt

Nine Fears about The Future of Data & Technology – Edelman – interesting research with the University of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre

Europe after Brexit | Control Risks – basically the EU is better off without the UK

No ‘new London’ in EU after Brexit – RTE – more likely to be geographically fragmented around specialisms such as insurance, fund management etc

The once-mocked iPhone Plus has proven to be Apple’s best bet in years | Quartz – interesting that the article is viewing it from a very western-centric viewpoint. Big phones were in APAC for years before iPhone

Apple’s record quarter by the numbers – Six Colors – the iPad’s bright spots are in China and India – its basically a media playback device

Important Announcement Regarding Club Penguin on Desktop and Mobile Devices | Club Penguin – wow, it had been a stalwart of virtual purchases and child friendly social networks for a good number of years. I wonder what the new platform will look like

Communities Dominate Brands: Deloitte Counted 120 Million Used Smartphones Were Sold in 2016 (growth of 50% vs 2015) – Understanding the second-hand handset market

Five for Friday | 五日(星期五)

Things that made my day this week:

I was in Madrid for the early part of the week and caught up on my reading

Lifting the lid on Japan’s underground Chicano culture | Dazed

I was mostly listening to this six hour mix of 1960s tracks by Greg Wilson

John McTiernan of Die Hard fame makes a live action trailer for a video game, great short film ensues

Combine your love of anime with your desire to get fit

Via Mr Mad Taiwan this is apparently an Apple ad showcasing the night photography capability of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

Oprah Time: reading over Chinese New Year

I have managed to catch up on a lot of reading over the Lunar New Year festival.

Joe Studwell’s How Asia Works is fascinating reading. It talks about how Korea, Japan and China have grown while their counterparts haven’t. Studwell highlights a number of factors that contribute to economic growth:

  • With an agrian economy, a market garden approach to agriculture rather than farming at scale delivers the best results. But only if rent seeking interests are removed through effective agricultural reform
  • Industry requires total mastery of technology – which is the reason why low grade heavy industry is the starting point
  • Exports planned into industrial development from the beginning and a continued relentless focus on exports is required
  • Governments are best at keeping businesses focused on total technology mastery, raising cheap finance and weeding out failures that might be a resource suck

Studwell critiques how different countries throughout Asia have managed to process in this manner including both the strengths and the weaknesses of their respective approaches.

It was fascinating to read how Taiwan managed to succeed in spite of nationalised industries and the challenges in China’s agricultural model.  How General Park ‘motivated’ Korean chaebols and the tragedy of development in Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines.

China’s Crony Capitalism by Minxin Pei explained the mechanism of how corrupt officials, state enterprise employees and businesspeople managed to bilk the Chinese government and people of vast amounts of money. Much of the challenge is structural. China has a federalised government with power lying at provincial, city and county level. Pei is hawkish on the country’s prospects.

For an outside observer Pei’s research into the mechanisms, one can appreciate the challenge that the central government faces in combatting corruption and bad behaviour. President Xi’s ‘tigers and flies’ campaign to root out the worst corruption in the party and business is part of the solution; but according to Pei there is also careful structural reform required. This will only be possible through a massive aggregation of power towards the centre.

Links of the day | 在网上找到

Bosch, Cisco, Gemalto and More: Tech Giants Team Up For Blockchain-IoT – CoinDesk – Buzzword compliance, but what’s wrong with strong crypto without cloud intermediation?

Seven years after its launch, it’s still not entirely clear what an iPad is for | Quartz – I know that feeling well

3D TV is officially dead as Sony and LG stop making sets | FierceCable – “Purchase process research showed it’s not a top buying consideration, and anecdotal information indicated that actual usage was not high. We decided to drop 3D support for 2017 in order to focus our efforts on new capabilities such as HDR, which has much more universal appeal.”

Vanishing point: the rise of the invisible computer | The Guardian – there is also the question of usability as well

Louis Vuitton, Supreme and the tangled relationship between streetwear and luxury brands

The recent collaboration between New York’s Supreme and Louis Vuitton seems like a natural fit.  The reality is that luxury and streetwear have been dancing around each other for a good while.

Snide started it all

Snide was slang in the 1980s for fake or counterfeit. Hip Hop and the Caribbean-influenced Buffalo movement in the UK each used counterfeit and real luxury in their own way.

Daniel Day, better known as Dapper Dan was a was a Harlem-based craftsman and business man who dressed a lot of New York based artists from the golden age of hip hop. Dan’s first hip hop client was LL Cool J back in 1985. Dan’s style was luxe, the finest silks and furs were standard issue – think Puff Daddy before Puff Daddy. They went for customised outfits with their branding on which Dan provided. As the scene took off Dan incorporated suit lining material (which replicated the likes of the Fendi, Bally  or MCM brands) and Gucci or Louis Vuitton branded vinyl to make one-off products.

He customised trainers, clothing and even car interiors. Dan’s own Jeep Wrangler had an interior retrimmed in MCM branded vinyl.

Much of the luxury branding Dan used was coming in from Korean factories which at that time supplied the fake trade. Now similar products would have come out of China. I took a trip to the South China City complex in 2010 where fabric suppliers would offer Louis Vuitton labels and Supreme tags side-by-side.  I can only imagine that the Korean suppliers of the 1980s  had similar markets in textile industry centres like Deagu. Outside of hip hop, Dan was the go-to tailor for all the hustlers in Harlem – so you can see how he could have got the hook-up into the counterfeit suppliers.

At the time hip hop culture was not in a relationship with brands who where concerned about how it might affect them. LL Cool J was the first artist to get a deal with Le Coq Sportif. Run DMC got a long term deal with Adidas after their single ‘My Adidas’ became successful. But these were the exceptions to the rule.  So with Dan’s help they co-opted the brands to try and demonstrate success.

Over in the UK, the Buffalo collective of stylists, artists and photographers including Ray Petri, Jamie Morgan, Barry Kamen (who modelled for Petri), Mark Lebon and Cameron McVey. Buffalo was known as an attitude, which threw contrasting styles together and filtered into fashion shoots and influenced the collections of major designers including Yohji Yamamoto, Jean Paul Gaultier and Comme des Garçons. Even if you didn’t know what Buffalo was, you would have recognised the aesthetic from the likes of i-D, Blitz, New Musical Express and Arena. 

Buffalo mixed Armani jackets with Doctor Martens work boots, or a Puma bobble hat. Petri used music to sound track his process and this was pretty similar to the kind of stuff that influenced street wear pioneer Shawn Stussy over in California. Motown and hip-hop to dub reggae was the sound which explains the Feeling Irie t-shirts created by the white surfboard maker.

If you thought Bros looked cool in their MA-1 bomber jackets and stone washed Levi’s 501 jeans – there was a direct stylistic line back to Buffalo – rehabilitating the items from their link to skinhead culture.

Buffalo permeated into the street style of the decade; influencing the likes of Soul II Soul. Meanwhile over in Bristol The Wild Bunch were yet to morph into Massive Attack. Two members headed to London; producer Nelle Hooper and Miles Johnson (aka DJ Milo who went on to work in New York and Japan). A shoot was organised by i-D magazine and they turned up wearing their street clothes alongside DJ Dave Dorrell and model / stylist Barnsley. At the time, it was considered to be ‘very Buffalo’ in feel, but Dave Dorrell admitted in an interview that they had just came as they were. Dorrell wore his t-shirt as ‘advertising’ for it.

buffalo

The Hermes t-shirt and belt were snide, the Chanel Number 5 t-shirt sported by Dave Dorrell were being knocked out by a group of friends. Young people in London co-opted brands just like the hip-hop artists heading to Dapper Dan’s in Harlem.

Homage

From 1980, surfer Shawn Stussy had been growing an clothing empire of what we would now recognise as streetwear. Stussy had originally came up with the t-shirts as an adjunct and advertisement of his main business – selling surfboards. But the clothing hit emerging culture: skating, punk, hip-hop and took on a life of its own. It went global through Stussy’s ‘tribe’ of friends that he made along the way.

Stussy is known for his eclectic influences and mixing media: old photographs alongside his own typography. In a way that was unheard of in brand circles at the time, Stussy manifested his brands in lots of different ways. The back to back SS logo inside a circle was a straight rip from Chanel; the repeating logo motif that appeared in other designs was a nod to MCM and Louis Vuitton.

All of this went into the cultural melting pot of world cities like Tokyo, New York, London and Los Angeles. Stussy went on to do collaborations from a specially designed party t-shirt for i-D magazine’s birthday party to the cover art of Malcolm Maclaren records. Collaboration with mundane and high-end brands is backed into streetwear’s DNA.

Coke Zero x Neighborhood limited edition cans

(Neighborhood x Coke Zero was something I was involved with during my time in Hong Kong.)

Japan with its engrained sense of quality and wabisabi took the Buffalo mix-and-match approach to the next level. Japan’s own streetwear labels like Visivim, Neighborhood, W-Taps, The Real McCoy and A Bathing Ape (BAPE) took streetwear product quality, exclusivity and price points into luxury brand territory. That didn’t stop BAPE from making a snide versions of various Rolex models under the ‘Bapex’ brand.

Bapex

Some two decades later Supreme came up in New York. The brand takes design appropriation and homage to a new level. Every piece Supreme seems to do is a reference to something else. The famous box logo rips from Barbara Kruger’s piece ‘I shop therefore I am’. From taking a snide swipe at consumerism to ending up in the belly of the beast took Supreme a relatively short time. This heritage of appropriation didn’t stop Supreme from using legal means against people it felt had appropriated its ‘look’.

In an ironic twist of fate, Supreme was sued by Louis Vuitton in 2000 and yet the 2017 collaboration looks exceptionally similar to the offending items…

The last time I shared this story the page was just at 2k followers. With the collaboration officially announced today- and the page having 40k more followers since then- I figure it’s time to re-share. The year was 2000, and a 6 year old Supreme took their hands at referencing a high fashion brand as they did early on (Burberry, Gucci,) this time with Louis Vuitton. Box Logo tees (and stickers), beanies, 5 panels, bucket hats, and skateboard decks all featured the Supreme Monogram logo (pictured right). Within two weeks, Vuitton sends in a cease and desist and apparently, ordered Supreme to burn the remaining available stock. Clearly, many of the products from 2000 are still in the resell market, circulating today. Now we arrive at today’s FW Louis Vuitton fashion show. As most everyone is aware by now, Supreme is in fact collaborating with the luxury brand for a July- into fall collection. I’ve seen quite a few pieces from the collaboration (20+, check @supreme__hustle @supreme_access and @supreme_leaks_news for more pics) and it’s panning out to be Supremes largest collaboration to date. It’s interesting to see the references of both brands within the collaboration- from old Dapper Dan bootleg Louis pieces, to authentic ones, to Supremes monogram box logo and skateboard desks (pictured left). 17 years later and @mrkimjones proves that time can mend all wounds (amongst other things). Excited to see what all will release alongside this legendary collaboration. #supremeforsale #supreme4sale

A photo posted by Supreme (@supreme_copies) on

The new customers

North East Asia’s fast growing economies had been borne out of learning from developed market expertise, state directed focus on exports and ruthless weeding out of weaker businesses. Intellectual property was cast aside at various points. Korea, Hong Kong, Japan and China went from making knock-off products to displacing Europe and the US as the leading luxury markets.

Asian luxury consumers, particularly those second generation rich in China were younger than the typical customer luxury brands cater too. These consumers bought product as they travelled taking in style influences as they went. First from nearby markets like Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore and then Korea. This drew from a melange of hip hop, streetwear, Buffalo styling and contemporary western designers like Vivienne Westwood – as well as the more matronly styles of the traditional European luxury houses.

The luxury brands had to adapt. They brought in new designers who themselves were drawing from similar influences.  These designers also collaborated with sportswear brands like Alexander McQueen and Puma or Jeremy Scott and Raf Simons for Adidas.

Luxury brands got seriously into new product categories making luxe versions of training shoes that could be charitably called a homage to the like of Nike’s Air Force 1.

Bringing things full circle

As the supreme_copies Instagram account notes the collaboration with Supreme and Louis Vuitton brings things full circle with the pieces having a nod to Dapper Dan’s custom work as well as Supreme’s own ‘homage’.  Luxury brand MCM (Michael Cromer München), which Dan borrowed from extensively in the 1980s was restructured in 1997 with shops and brand being sold separately. The brand was eventually acquired eight years later by the Korean Sungjoo Group. Korea now has its own fast developing luxury fashion and cosmetics brand industry. Textile city Deagu which was the likely source of Dapper Dan’s fabric is now a fashion and luxury business hub in its own right. The Korean entertainment industry is a trend setter throughout Asia. For instance, Hallyu drama My Love From A Star drove breakout sales for the Jimmy Choo ‘Abel’ shoe.

The only question I still have is why did a move like Louis Vuitton’s collaboration with Supreme take so long? The luxury brands spend a lot on customer insight, they were using social listening far longer than they had been on social media. They know that a customer wearing their jacket could have a Visivim backpack slung over the shoulder and a pair of Adidas Stan Smiths on their feet. Customers mix-and-match Buffalo style for all but the most formal occasions. For streetwear brands, collaboration is in their DNA and they get an additional leg-up in the quality stakes.

More information
Ray Petri
How Buffalo shaped the landscape of 80s fashion – Dazed
Dave Dorrell interview part one | Test Pressing
Dapper Dan
Barbara Kruger Responds to Supreme’s Lawsuit: ‘A Ridiculous Clusterf**k of Totally Uncool Jokers’ | Complex
Volume and wealth make Chinese millennials a lucrative target market: GfK | Luxury Daily
Just why are Louis Vuitton and other high-end retailers abandoning China? | South China Morning Post – although Chinese shoppers consumed 46 per cent of luxury goods around the world, their purchases in their home market accounted for only 10 per cent of global sales, falling from 11 per cent in 2012 and 13 per cent in 2013
How a Jimmy Choo Shoe Became a Global Best Seller – WSJ

Living with the Casio GWF -D1000 Frogman watch

When you typically look at reviews of products, there are usually reviewed over a short time when they are new-and-shiny. Often a products features and character come out over time – a symbiotic process between product and user.

I picked up a GWF-D1000 soon after it went on sale for considerably less than the £800 that it is the current street price. Up until I bought the GWF-D1000 (which I will call the D1000 through the rest of the copy for brevity), I had owned its predecessor the GWF-1000 (which I will call the 1000 from here on in).

So what is the GWF-D1000 anyway?

The D1000 is the latest in an a series of G-Shock watches aimed at scuba divers. The first Frogman came out in 1993. The overall design has largely been the same with an asymmetric case and a large display to make operation easier. The positioning of the watches and price points changed over time – some of the previous models had titanium cases and came under the Mr-G sub-brand. The last few models have a stainless steel core case with a DLC (diamond like coating) to protect the surface.

Over time it has picked up features as the technology improved. It became illuminated by a small green bulb, then electro-luminescent material. It moved from relying purely on battery power to having solar cells and a rechargeable battery. The watch became more accurate by picking up time signals via radio from six locations around the world that are calibrated with an atomic clock (precursors to the NTP services around the world that keep your computer and smartphone bang on time.)

The key technology gains over the 1000 include:

  • A dive computer rather than a dive timer (neither matter to me), it has the same basic functionality that dive computers used to have 20 years ago (minus PC connectivity). No big shakes until you remember that it is doing this all from a solar-powered rechargeable watch battery
  • Digital compass which is surprisingly handy, it is very forgiving of the way you hold it, expect this in other Casio watches soon.
  • Temperature reading (again more for the diver) or when you are running a bath
  • The display has been rearranged and a bit easier to read
  • Much better display light and crisper to read at night

The real benefits for me were in the build quality:

  • You get a sapphire crystal rather than the usual hardened mineral glass. This isn’t the first time that Casio has used a sapphire crystal on a watch, but they are harder to manufacture and more expensive than the usual mineral glass face
  • The manner in which the strap is secured to the case has been completely revised. There is are new Allen key screws and a carbon fibre rod to secure the strap to the case
  • The strap is made of polyurethane resin reinforced with carbon fibre. The loop that holds the excess strap length is now a section of stainless steel which has been bent around the strap

How do I use it?

It makes sense to tell a little bit around why I wear a Frogman. I want an accurate watch (who doesn’t?). I want a reliable watch (again, probably a hygiene factor for most people; but one that hints at why the G-Shock has replaced Rolex as the default watch I have seen on Hong Kongers over the past 10 years or so. G-Shock offers robustness that 20 years ago would have come from fine Swiss engineering – at a much lower price point.

I love my Swiss dive watches but there is a time and place for everything.  The knockabout case and its water resistance means that you can forget about the watch. You don’t have to coddle it or worry that it will pick up undue attention. You don’t have to worry if you get a bang on an elevator (lift) door, dropped on the bathroom floor or going for a swim.

The G-Shock is an everyman watch – unless its got a lurid colour scheme it isn’t likely to attract the attention of your average petty criminal. I’ve often taken it off in the office so that I can type in greater comfort and left it there by accident when going home. I’ve never had a G-Shock go missing.

It is relatively easy to use, despite the modal nature of its interface design. To change settings, use functions or see recorded information you have to cycle through a series of text menus – it has more in common with a 1980s vintage video cassette recorder or a DEC VAX. Quite how this goes down with consumers more used to iPads and SnapChat is interesting. Casio seems to do alright by attracting them with bright plastic cases reminiscent of Lego -based colour schemes.

I haven’t dived seriously in a long time, I took up scuba diving while working in the oil industry and have never got back into it since moving to London.  PADI diving at resorts is tame compared to British diving club scene I had been used to.

My work environment is creative which means that t-shirts, flannel shirts,  jeans and suede hiking boots make the G-Shock an ideal accessory. I work in the London office of an American digital marketing agency, owned by a French multinational and my clients are scattered in the different offices around the world of pharmaceutical companies. The functions I tend to use most are the world time, date/time and the night light. My iPhone is now my alarm clock.

The reality is that most of these watches will end up on the wrists of people like me rather than people who dive for a living.

What’s it like to live to live with the D1000

The D1000 is only incrementally heavier than the 1000, it felt a bit strange to wear for about 30 minutes after swapping over to the newer model. But in some ways the D1000 doesn’t yet feel like its my watch.

The 1000 strap became shiny in places over time and more pliable, it felt like it became adjusted to me. Give the D1000 a rub over and it still looks box fresh. The downside is that the strap feels stiff and I still feel its edges on occasion – this isn’t about discomfort, but about the watch not feeling like part of you. There are no shiny parts of wear – it feels less like a ‘personal item”. It lacks what a designer friend calls authenticity; unlike distressed jeans, customised flight jackets or combat Zippos.

Zippo Lighters

This sounds great for the resale value, but I feel that it provides a worse experience for the wearer of the watch.

The reinforced strap does have one bonus, it holds securely to the case. Look at these pictures of my two year old 1000

Casio GWF 1000 Frogman

You can see how the retaining screw that held the strap to the case came undone and disappeared over time. You don’t have these kind of problems with the D1000.

The screen on the D1000 uses its real estate in a different way to the 1000.

Here is the 1000

Casio GWF 1000 Frogman

Here is the D1000

Casio GWF D1000 Frogman

At first the differences aren’t obvious. If you look at the top right side of the screen, the tide and moon segments are replaced by a multi-use screen on the D1000. The small icons for alarms and hourly alerts are moved to the bottom and left of the screen on the D1000, the moon icon now moves to the left of the main screen down from the top right. This probably marginally increases the screen real estate and helps make legibility a bit clearer at night.

GWF 1000

The biggest 1000 feature that I miss is the ability to toggle with one press of the top left button from showing the date on the screen to showing a second time zone; it was extremely handy for work. And having come from the 1000 to the D1000 it was a real ‘what the fuck’ moment.

By comparison I have to press six times to get to the world time screen. Instead, it now toggles between a tide table and the day. Even giving it a two press option would be a better fix than what the D1000 currently has. It’s a small gripe, but it annoyed the heck out of me.

My work around has been to keep the watch in world time mode and if I need to know the day or date, I find myself reaching for my iPhone.

If you are really that worried about tide tables, you will be likely using a specialist service as they vary a good deal over relatively short distances.

If the D1000 still sounds like the kind of watch you want, you can get it here.

Links of the day | 在网上找到

Americans and Cybersecurity | Pew Research Center – trust in institutions to keep their data safe has plummeted

McDonald’s may have a Big Mac ATM, but America has been trying to automate cheeseburgers for more than 50 years — Quartz – robotics disrupting ‘McJobs’

How WeChat bots are running amok | VentureBeat – black market AI powered bots used on WeChat to build friendship and bilk netizens out of cash

China warned of risk to banks from One Belt, One Road initiative | FT – no clear commercial imperative

China’s Army of Global Homebuyers Is Suddenly Short on Cash – Bloomberg – pop goes the London housing bubble?

It’s Generation X, not millennials, who are obsessed with Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter — Quartz – interesting research

The Chinese News App with 600 Million Users That You’ve Never Heard Of | MIT Technology Review – Toutiao uses AI to curate headline recommendations

Hitachi Maxell’s LED Lantern Powered by Water, Salt – Nikkei Technology Online – interesting design – Japan has a ‘prepper’ culture due to the earthquakes and tidal waves that happen

Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership Failed | Slate – good pointers for Brexit and beyond too

Professional pay skewed by snobbery (in UK) | FT – government finds that even if you make it as a working class person in a middle class job, you’ll still be paid less

It’s About Free Speech, Says Tech CEO Cashing In On Breitbart Ads – Medium – when mainstream media aren’t making money from online ad dollars, I can understand why Taboola are hanging on in there

Formula safety still a prime concern of Chinese mums | Campaign Asia – also since grandparents spend a big part in raising the kids, adverts should acknowledge their contribution (paywall)

WeChat’s Hot New Feature Will Be Tricky for Marketers | Digital – AdAge – apps within the app are a new paradigm for marketers

Gen Z Likes Shopping In-Store; Seeing Items Encourages Purchases | MarketingCharts – so why are malls dying then?

Will voice services like Amazon’s Alexa really rise as fast as predicted? | The Drum – interesting op-ed by Rob Blackie. Not as fast as predicted (paywall)

Can post-Brexit London survive as Europe’s cultural and financial capital? | The Guardian – it will take a right kicking basically, some sectors much worse than others

China Marketers Reveal Digital Challenges For Country’s PR Firms: Study | Holmes Report – Interesting reading; that digital is more important is no surprise; agency relationships dropping from 2.9 years to 2.5 years is a surprise though – shorter than advertising etc. PR is more likely a tactical buy

Samsung finally explained what caused the Galaxy Note 7 explosions | Quartz – it sounds like a deeper process issue in design and supply chain management

Three Theories Behind the Global Productivity Slowdown | Naked Capitalism – interesting read, though they are theories only

Xiaomi’s Plan to Rule the World: Build Every Gadget Imaginable | WIRED – more the vintage Sony or Panasonic model than the Nokia model

Vincent Canfield’s Blog – It’s been a while – Chaos Communications Congress hacker meets US customs

Apple’s Full lawsuit against Qualcomm Comes to Light Revealing Secret Licensing Agreements and more – Patently Apple – interesting picking apart of Apple’s claims so it makes sense

China’s fintech industry shows where the rest of the world is heading | Techinasia – interesting read, though China’s conditions are unique

Apple Sues Qualcomm for $1 Billion | CNBC – What’s the back story, why now?

WeChat Official Account Platform | Grata – great write-up

Mobile eSports | JWT Intelligence – interesting that it has finally moved to mobile platforms

Republican Lawmakers in Five States Propose Bills to Criminalize Peaceful Protest | The Intercept – Roger Corman’s Death Race 2000 seems eerily prescient

The State of Journalism in China—Ed Wong’s Exit Interview | ChinaFile – worth a listen

Don’t Blame Davos Man for Globalization’s Limits – Bloomberg View – great read

Not Just A Crock: The Viral Word-Of-Mouth Success Of Instant Pot : The Salt : NPR – expecting to see this as a case study in PR decks moving forward

How a football publisher repurposed one event’s worth of video for 4 different platforms – Digiday– really nice laymans guide to video platforms

This Team Runs Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Page – Bloomberg – interesting blend of personal and business brand

Do You Want Smell-O-Vision for Your VR Porn? Neither Do We But Here It Is | Motherboard – interesting technology, ewwww product

Five for Friday | 五日(星期五)

Things that made my day this week:

Today is Chinese New Year, its the year of the rooster

Happy lunar new year

The Singaporean Government killed with this anti-diabetes message for Chinese New Year parties

The track gaining heaviest rotation on my old school iPod was this cover by Phil Weeks

Listen to Ambient Sounds with Music – Deepfocus.io – to help with productivity when I am delving into data

What Comes Next Is the Future (2016) on Vimeo – great documentary on the history of the web and where it going in the future

 

Great example of YouTube ad targeting really well done

I had a quick look at the news announced at music technology show NAMM -its CeBIT or CES for DJs and music producers and came across a great review by Magnetic Magazine of Denon’s new DJ product range.
great targeting

But the marketer in me picked up on the great ad placement by Pioneer on the YouTube video which took much of the benefit out of the great PR opportunity that Denon had on their hands.

You would have to be a pretty mean spirited marketing manager to have a minor grumble about the art work being covered up in the bottom right hand corner with ‘Ads by Google’.

Links of the day | 在网上找到

Apple’s Full lawsuit against Qualcomm Comes to Light Revealing Secret Licensing Agreements and more – Patently Apple – interesting picking apart of Apple’s claims so it makes sense

China’s fintech industry shows where the rest of the world is heading | Techinasia – interesting read, though China’s conditions are unique

The Geopolitics Of 2017 In 4 Maps | Zero Hedge

Apple Sues Qualcomm for $1 Billion | CNBC – What’s the back story, why now?

WeChat Official Account Platform | Grata – great write-up

Mobile eSports | JWT Intelligence – interesting that it has finally moved to mobile platforms

Republican Lawmakers in Five States Propose Bills to Criminalize Peaceful Protest | The Intercept – Roger Corman’s Death Race 2000 seems eerily prescient

Brexit Effect Drives Tourist Spending in the UK | Business of Fashion – so its temporary

The State of Journalism in China—Ed Wong’s Exit Interview | ChinaFile – worth a listen

Don’t Blame Davos Man for Globalization’s Limits – Bloomberg View – great read

Magic Lantern Festival, Chiswick House Gardens

The Magic Lantern Festival reminded me a bit of the Chinese New Year fairs that I have been to in the past in terms of the hustle and bustle. Turnham Green tube station is just over a mile away on foot.

Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Sauce

It’s hard to get good photographs of the displays because of the crowds, but I’ve put some of them here. The festival is open until the end of February.

Links of the day | 在网上找到

Not Just A Crock: The Viral Word-Of-Mouth Success Of Instant Pot : The Salt : NPR – expecting to see this as a case study in ‘value of PR’ decks moving forward

The Ultimate Guide to Baidu SEO in China | Dragon Metrics – great 101 guide in English to Baidu

How a football publisher repurposed one event’s worth of video for 4 different platforms – Digiday – really nice laymans guide to video platforms

This Team Runs Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook Page – Bloomberg – interesting blend of personal and business brand

Banks Welcome May’s Phased Brexit Bid Amid Plans to Relocate – Bloomberg – at the time of writing Morgan Stanley, UBS and HSBC indicated a definite move. Japanese government had already said its banks would start the move in 2017

Do You Want Smell-O-Vision for Your VR Porn? Neither Do We But Here It Is | Motherboard – interesting technology, ewwww product

Five for Friday | 五日(星期五)

Things that made my day this week:

If you manage to pull your reading out of the UK media you would have seen that the World Economic Forum in Davos. What’s really interesting is how the gathered elites don’t have an answer for populism.

Two things from Davos, the panel below featuring Christine Lagarde of the IMF, Italian finance minister Pier Carlo Padoan, academic and statesman Larry Summers. The message that there is no silver bullet just won’t work in a western style democracy and the kind of changes needed would require a long term consensus

Edelman launched the 2017 edition of their Trust Barometer with the theme the implosion of trust. The reality is much more extreme and internalised; a prolapse of trust would be a more-fitting description – but probably not very Bloomberg or FT friendly.

Global results

UK cut of the data: Richard usually goes to Davos, but has a stop off at the London office to give the first local barometer presentation

 

Teresa May’s speech on Brexit was primarily designed to address a delusional domestic audience of grassroots Conservatives and the UKIP sympathisers (who historically would have been the ‘Loadsamoney Tories‘). HSBC announced the following day that it was moving 20% of its staff out of the London headquarters to Paris; expect more similar announcements. I will leave the last word on it to the FT.

Opera have done some interesting UX work on their browser and how to interact with the web. I don’t expect Opera Neon to change the browser world, but we could see iterations on its themes in other products.

This anti-smoking billboard is a great example of well designed digital out-of-home creative

The Weather Underground have come up with some amazing posters, more here.

Links of the day | 在网上找到

Getting to know: Perkbox – TalentRocket blog – great profile of my hombre from Yahoo!: Chieu’s joint

EU Space Agency’s Galileo satellites stricken by mystery clock failures • The Register – hacked?

Theresa May’s speech: The view from Europe – University of Liverpool News – University of Liverpool – playing for the peanut gallery

Qualcomm: FTC Alleges Special Deal with Apple – Tech Trader Daily – Barrons.com – Extracted exclusivity from Apple in exchange for reduced patent royalties. Qualcomm precluded Apple from sourcing baseband processors from Qualcomm’s competitors from 2011 to 2016. Qualcomm recognized that any competitor that won Apple’s business would become stronger, and used exclusivity to prevent Apple from working with and improving the effectiveness of Qualcomm’s competitors.

WSJ City – CPI Hits Two-Year High – UK price inflation due to currency devaluation is going to put a pre-Brexit squeeze on the economy prior to the post-Brexit tumble

Uber and Seamless ads reveal how Silicon Valley is screwing us – Sandpaper Suit – Medium – Silicon Valley’s gateway to serfdom

Instagram Live Stories officially lands in the UK | The Drum – now be able to officially go live within its ephemeral content service

The Problem With AMP | 80×24 – behaviour worthy of antitrust player

Google RAISR Intelligently Makes Low-Res Images High Quality | PCMag.com – whats the difference between this and a near lossless compression algorithm?

Microsoft Veteran Will Help Run Chinese Search Giant Baidu – Bloomberg – Qi Liu from Yahoo! to Microsoft and of to Baidu

Rubicon Project Reportedly Exploring Potential Sale | Media Post – ad tech is taking a beating

We Are Social’s Monday Mashup #337  – interesting data on SnapChat and brand abandonment of the platform

EU: Robot Workers Are ‘Electronic Persons’ – Robotics & Automation – Products

Greggs to trial delivery service in London | London Evening Standard – unfortunately only in the Square Mile at the moment

Korean duty free shops rely on online Chinese celebs | SCMP – when will the duty free trade be weaponised by China to deal with THAAD