Categories
传播媒体 | media | 미디어

Think your week is bad?

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Spare a thought for the ‘performers’ in the adult entertainment industry. According to the Sydney Morning Herald and Reuters, two of the industry’s stars have been found to be HIV+; the first since 1999. Although the mainstream American porn industry has a rigorous testing regime orchestrated by the AIM Foundation where 1,200 stars get tested every three weeks the two people had managed to have sex with 48 other performers since their last test three weeks earlier. A 60-day halt has been called to filming so that anyone who has been in contact with these performers during this time (and their partners etc) can be tested to keep the outbreak under control.

The HIV has been blamed on a non-condom shoot one of the performers was involved in held in Brazil. The industry has been especially conscious of HIV since John Holmes the ‘Elvis of porn’ died of AIDS in the late 1980’s, bringing to an end what many view as the industry’s golden era. What I think is more frightening is the trend towards gonzo, low rent amateur material that is the rising star in the industry since the advent of the web. This part of the business does not undergo the same rigorous regime as its mainstream counterpart is a health timebomb waiting to go off.

While we are on about things of an industrious nature Rainier PR have launched the Cambridge Confidence Index. According to them this will cover both business and quality-of-life issues.

Categories
传播媒体 | media | 미디어 媒体与艺术 | culture | 미디어와 예술 工艺学 | technology | 기술

The Wired Magazine curse strikes again

Reading Time: < 1 minute

Following in the illustrious footsteps of Enron, Vivendi Universal / Vizzavi and Iridium. The DARPA Grand Challenge fell victim to the curse of the eight-page spread in Wired Magazine.

What is the Grand Challenge?

The Grand Challenge was a way of DARPA (America’s military think-tank who supported the development of the graphical user interface for computers, the development of packet networks and the ARPAnet (the Internet’s granddaddy)) to get ideas on the best way to develop driverless vehicles (ensuring that the Private Lynch fiasco could not happen again).

What went wrong?

An assortment of vehicles were going to navigate without human help from Bakersfield to Las Vegas. The event was feted as a true geek sporting event by intelligent techie site IT Conversations.

Unfortunately the vehicles underperformed with the best only managing to get seven miles down the road. Hopefully the lessons learned will be worth the considerable resources thrown at the problem.